Robot Cleans Power Plant Boiler Tube Walls

Ithaca, NY

Dec 1, 2015 – For Immediate Release

ICM is announcing the development of a magnetically held robot specifically to climb and clean Boiler Tube Walls in power plants. This Boiler Tube Wall Climbing (BTWC) robot is lightweight, portable, has big payload capability and is designed specifically for the harsh, dirty conditions and the confined space of working in boilers within power plants, though it can also be used in refineries and other heavy industry. Another great feature of the ICM BTWC robot is its ability to climb on an array of boiler tube walls comprised of tubes in the typical diameter ranges found in the Power Industry. ICM once again sets new standards for “climbing robots” and leads the industry with the following characteristics: Ease of use, design for field conditions, versatility, simplicity of design, ruggedness and dependability.

ICM Boiler Tube Wall Climbing (BTWC) Robot. Photo Credit: icm.cc
ICM Boiler Tube Wall Climbing (BTWC) Robot. Photo Credit: icm.cc
ICM Boiler Tube Wall Climbing (BTWC) Robot on Boiler Tube Mockup . Photo Credit: icm.cc
ICM Boiler Tube Wall Climbing (BTWC) Robot on Boiler Tube Mockup . Photo Credit: icm.cc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICM Boiler Tube Wall Climbing (BTWC) Robot Climbing on Boiler Tube Wall Mockup. Photo Credit: icm.cc
ICM Boiler Tube Wall Climbing (BTWC) Robot Climbing on Boiler Tube Wall Mockup. Photo Credit: icm.cc

This new robot was originally developed for ENEL, one of the largest utilities in the world, based in Italy. ENEL has taken delivery of this robot and intends on getting it in the field as soon as possible.

Integrated on this robot is a mechanical cleaning brush that can use a variety of different brushes and is also removable. It also comes with two (2) cameras, one mounted in the front and one mounted on the back. One camera is to aid in navigation and one is used to visually inspect the cleaned surface. The robot could be outfitted with Ultra sound, thermography or virtually any NDT (NonDestructive Testing) technology.
The use of such a field robot should reduce costs, increase worker safety because now workers will not be exposed to elevated heights or to breathing in the debris and dust from cleaning operations, and save time! “We will be working closely with ENEL to garner feedback on the performance of this robot in the field. Many power plants around the world could benefit from this technology, stated Samuel Maggio, president of ICM.
For more information on this BTWC robot, please contact visit the ICM website http://www.icm.cc or contact ICM at 607 288 4001.